Technology

Protect the digital you. Secure yourself with these simple privacy hacks.

I’m no Steve Wozniak but, like many others, I carry a healthy distrust of computers. After the massive Equifax breach affecting the privacy of 145.5M Americans and following by the “hugely problematic” Edgar data hack affecting major stock exchanges p@raNoiA levels globally have hit a new plateau.

Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.

Steve Wozniak

Securing your cryptocurrency with Google Authenticator? That decision may make you angry one day. But that's okay because Authy is here to save the day.

The first thing you need to learn when you start working with Bitcoin is to set-up 2FA. The most common forms of two-factor auth today are standard telephony and security tokens, which come in both the soft and hard variety.

If we took hard U2F tokens off the table, we’re left with software and telephony. Which of the two would you choose? Well, it depends. Let’s explore.

Be your own bank. Store your secure, private and untraceable cryptocurrency and keep it safe from prying eyes. Learn to take flight with the Monero CLI wallet.

Monero is a secure, private, and untraceable cryptocurrency. It is open-source and accessible to all. With Monero, you are your own bank. Only you control and are responsible for your funds. Your accounts and transactions are kept private from prying eyes. Learn how to install the Monero CLI wallet. There’s only one way…

Arise, you have nothing to lose but your barbed wire fences!

Timothy C. May, The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto

Connecting devices like the RPi or Apple TV to public networks requiring browser-based auth can be a drag. But that shouldn't stop you from hacking your way in. Find out how.

Imagine your sitting at a coworking cafe in Bali after your last gadget run to Sim Lim Square where you picked up a CCTV Wi-Fi camera to protect your Bitcoin mining rig.

You unbox your new toy only to realize you can’t connect it because the cafe you’re sitting at is using a captive portal.

Gah! What to do… Shell into the device and use wget or curl? Fuggetaboutit.

You reach into your Tortuga carry-on bag, pull out your laptop and do the only sensible thing you can think of—spoof the device’s MAC address.

Here’s how to easily spoof the MAC address of an IoT device using macOS.

Don't buy Bitcoin, Volcano Boy! Make it spew out with these 11 easy hacks.

Jamie Dimon may believe Bitcoin’s ‘a fraud’ but I know a few CoinSheet enthusiasts who would beg to disagree. If you’re like me you might not be able to afford to buy Bitcoin. And no Bitcoin, no LaMbO… Not to worry though! I’m going to lay down 11 simple hacks to earn free bitcoin without breaking open the piggy bank.

Instant transactions. Zero fees. Spend your coins anywhere VISA is accepted.

Bitcoin saw a 355% return during the first 8 months of 2017. And some believe it may be worth as much as 500,000 per coin by 2030. But hanging onto your bitcoin doesn’t do you much good if you HODL it forever.

So what’s the best way to convert bitcoin into cash? Well, you could transfer it between wallets in exchange for cash on the spot. Or you could spend time trying to find a bitcoin ATM. But why go through the hassle?

If you need an easy way to spend some of your bitcoin without paying any fees what are you going to do? Well, the answer is pretty easy—get yourself a BitPay VISA card and spend without paying fees.

Managing asynchronous dependencies with JavaScript can be a nightmare. But there's a better way. It's called Fetch Injection.

I’ve long been inspired by the work of Steve Souders. In 2009 he published an article titled Loading Scripts Without Blocking, which I first became aware of and studied during my time at Orbitz – where every millisecond a user waited for the page to load had a measurable impact to the business.

Steve’s work was instrumental for the Web development community, and even inspired Nicholas C. Zakas to write Loading JavaScript without Blocking the same month Steve’s book Even Faster Web Sites was published.

Welcome to Hack Cabin. Learn about the site architecture and why it was built.

Back in 2008 I started my first blog. Its original incarnation was a WordPress site hosted on Bluehost. I’ll never forget the countless hours I spent wrestling with WordPress plug-in updates, sweating my database back-up process, fighting the content editor to produce valid markup and, on at least one occasion, losing several hours of work as a result of clicking the wrong button somewhere. WordPress was complicated and it sucked.

WordPress was complicated and it sucked.

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Browse the Web more securely.

I read an article on Medium titled How to encrypt your entire life in less than an hour. The article provided a number of tips for staying secure digitally. One of the tips was to use the TOR browser because popular browsers such as Safari and Chrome were not private enough – even in private mode.

What the author didn’t tell you was that it’s possible to increase your privacy without switching browsers using Dan Pollock’s hosts file. A quick look at the file describes exactly what it does…

There are many URL shorteners you can use to create tiny URLs for sharing on social media, but it's easy if you make your own branded short links.

Tiny URLs, otherwise known as short links. We’ve all used them to shorten URLs. Sometimes for sharing y2u.be videos. Or to make some 🧀 using amzn.to. Perhaps even to view someone else’s analytics data. And though some may lead you to believe short URLs can be dangerous, used thoughtfully they make a useful addition in your link building strategy. Learn how to make your own branded tiny URLs free in under 5 minutes.

The Devil is in the detail. About the After Dark 404 page redesign.

As mentioned in Initial Commit, Hack Cabin is powered by the open source After Dark theme for Hugo. When I originally created the theme in , the 404 page contained an MP4 throwback video paying homage to a certain popular screensaver introduced by Berkeley Systems for the Macintosh in 1989.

The video, and the After Dark theme name, were inspired by a website with an interactive After Dark simulator. And though unlikely either of us will ever be sued by Berkeley Systems, I’ve decided to retire the original video, and replace it with a new animated 404 page.